Monday, April 21, 2014

Brush My Teeth? Introducing the new #MilkBone Brushing Chews

Do Kelly and Ike like having their teeth brushed?
In a word--no.


When we go to the vet, she usually mentions dental care--after all, she's not only the dogs' doctor, but also their dentist. In his home before we adopted him, Ike ate through a door in order to get to a dog in heat and broke off most of his teeth. And Kelly is 13 years old and and has some tartar buildup. But still, I'm not great at keeping their teeth brushed. When I come at them with a toothbrush, they run the other way. Try prying their mouths open and scrubbing those teeth. No woofin' way. So I was excited to be asked to check out the new #MilkBone® Brushing Chews.



 Milk-Bone® Brushing Chews TM are bone-shaped chews, covered with nubs and ridges that are designed to clean like bristles on a toothbrush. The bone has a unique 75 degree twist design that helps dogs maneuver the chew to clean down to the gum line, including hard-to-reach back teeth.




















Kelly was my taste-tester for this product.

Kelly, which would you rather have, a toothbrush or Milk-Bone Brushing Chews?
















 
Yes! The Brushing Chews!
















  She excitedly accepted the treat and immediately went to work brushing---uh, chewing. I was surprised at how long the treat kept her busy, too. Much longer than most other chewy biscuits. Knowing that she enjoys the taste and chewing experience (much more than the struggle with the toothbrush), and that it is also helping to keep her teeth healthy, I can feel good about offering her this treat.

Milk-Bone® Brushing Chews (TM) are clinically proven to reduce: tartar build-up. They come in mini, small/medium, and large. Kelly sampled the small/medium size.

If you want to try them for yourself, they're easy to find--available wherever Milk-Bone® products are sold. And the suggested retail price is between $4 and $5 per box.

For more information:
Facebook
Milk-Bone® Website
Instagram- milkbone#
twitter-@MilkBone

Milk-Bone® wants to offer a Milk-Bone® Brushing Chew (TM) Dental Pack to 15 different winners! The Giveaway will be open through 11:59pm Eastern Time April 30th. All you need to do to enter is fill out the rafflecopter and make sure you do the mandatory entry of leaving a comment on my Blog Post. One winner per household. 

a Rafflecopter giveaway
 
Full Disclosure: This post is sponsored by Milk-Bone®. I am being compensated for helping spread the word about Milk-Bone® but Peggy's Pet Place only shares information we feel is relevant to our readers. Milk-Bone® is not responsible for the content of this article.

Want more positive pet tips, good news, and special offers? Fetch my free newsletter, Pawsitively Pets. Kelly and Ike hope to see you there!

Friday, April 18, 2014

FitDog Friday- H2O and giveaway

Yesterday, I walked into the kitchen and I looked down at the empty water bowl. It seemed I had just filled it moments ago! Sometimes, Kelly and Ike go through stages where they drink enough water to drain a lake. I hear the steady slurp slurp slurp and before I know it, the bowl is dry. We are always sure to keep filling it back up again.

What would we do without clean, clear water?

















Keeping your dog well hydrated is essential for:
circulation
digestion
temperature regulation
waste filtering
kidney and heart health
and more!

Now that the warmer weather is approaching, you're probably taking your dog on more outings and getting more exercise. It's easier to dehydrate when you've been exercising or when it's very hot.  

I've tried all sorts of different portable bowls for Kelly and Ike and recently discovered one I really like-- The K9 Cooler. My Kool Dog provided us with one to try out--and one to giveaway (enter the Rafflecopter at the end of the post!) We were thrilled with the results.

The K9 Cooler gets high grades on all counts!
1. It's well-made, durable and easy to fill.


















2.  It has a convenient handle which makes it easy to tote along.





















3. It keeps the water cold. All you do is put ice in the bottom compartment. And get this---when the ice melts, just flip it over and refill the bowl!


This is the compartment for ice.

















4. The large opening is easy for dogs to drink from. Some dogs don't like the small openings found in other portable bowls.



















 Note that the K9 Cooler is a good size. If you are hiking or for any reason needing to carry something small and lightweight, then you might want to use one of those nylon collapsible bowls. But still get the K9 Cooler, because there are so many other times you'll find it just the right bowl to take along on picnics, overnights, doggy park, and so many other outings. It holds a lot, so you won't need to worry about not having enough water for your dog.

















Now is your chance to win a K9 Cooler for your dog! Good luck!


a Rafflecopter giveaway


Full Disclosure: I was provided with one K9 Cooler to review and one K9 Cooler to give away. This in no way influenced my review. Opinions expressed here are 100% my own.


 FitDog Friday is co-hosted by Peggy's Pet Place, Slimdoggy, and To Dog with Love. Join our hop!













Want more positive pet tips, good news, and special offers? Fetch my free newsletter, Pawsitively Pets. Kelly and Ike hope to see you there!

 

Tuesday, April 15, 2014

Blog the Change for Animals- Responsible Pet Parenting

My son, who has own apartment, is ready to get his first dog of his own. I'm so excited to be a gramma! He's planning to get either a lab, golden retriever, or possibly a retired racing greyhound. He wants to adopt through a local rescue group, and if possible he'd like a puppy or young dog (We've had several of our senior rescue dogs cross over the bridge, so I can't say I blame him for wanting a younger one of his own.). We've been talking a lot about how a dog will change his life and the decisions he'll need to make. What is he going to feed the dog? How is he going to care for the dog while he's at work (9-5)? What about when he wants to go out after work, or has a softball game? How often will he walk the dog? etc. This has led to many interesting discussions about pet parenting. And when better to discuss this than on Blog the Change for Animals--a great day for promoting Responsible Pet Parenting to the next generation. So today, I thought I'd turn things around a bit--


My son with Kelly




















I've given him advice, but since kids so often listen to others more than their (extraordinarily wise, brilliant and never wrong) parents, I'd like to ask, What advice would you give my son? What should he know about responsible pet parenting? What are your best tips for a young man about to set out to adopt his very first best friend?
I'll be sure to give him all your comments.
Thank You!







Friday, April 11, 2014

FitDog Friday- Go, Dog, GoPro

One of these adorable pups is Simba, when he was an 8 weeks old in the shelter. Simba had no home, no family.
















Luckily for Simba, Doug came along. The two locked eyes and before you knew it, Simba found a new home and a new best friend. This is Simba now, 4 years later, with his adoptive dad, Doug.


























Simba is your typical dog--he likes to nap, he likes to cuddle. But there's a time and a place for everything, and there's only so much napping a young dog like Simba can do. Doug's an active guy, and Simba's not one to be left behind. So off they go, Simba running along while Doug rides his bike. They bike, hike, and swim making Simba a happy, healthy and fit dog! Watch this heartwarming video taken with Doug's GoPro, and see just how happy a fit dog can be.


Thank you Doug for sharing this wonderful video of a truly fit dog!

Want more positive pet tips, good news, and special offers? Fetch my free newsletter, Pawsitively Pets. Kelly and Ike hope to see you there! 


 FitDog Friday is co-hosted by Peggy's Pet Place, Slimdoggy, and To Dog with Love. Join our hop!

Wednesday, April 9, 2014

Why I want to Share my Home with Senior Dogs

USED: One 10 year old Basset Hound.
He doesn't move fast, he sheds, has gas, and eats like a horse.
And he's having "accidents".

Friends of ours fostered this dog. I think they were growing attached to him, despite the wet spots on the carpeting. Then along came an elderly couple, who fell and love and adopted the droopy-eared guy. They said it was their mission to give a good home to senior dogs.

 And I immediately thought, THAT'S WHAT I WANT TO DO! Adopt, or foster, senior dogs. After all, we have Kelly. She's 13 and living life to the fullest!


Kelly, now 13, is a happy senior dog.


















 And Ike, at age 8 is considered a senior as well.

Check out Ike's white spectacles!




















And we had Brooks, the best dog we've ever known. He was 11 years old when we adopted him. He seemed healthy, except for allergies. Then he was diagnosed with cancer, and died suddenly before we celebrated his One Year with our family.

Losing Brooks was one of the most difficult experiences I've faced. I stood by his gurney at the Emergency Vet, while he went into grand mal seizures, one after another. They said there was no option but to euthanize him, the cancer was most likely in his brain. I couldn't let them do it. Everyone left the room but me and Brooks, and I couldn't even pat the dog, who was no longer the Brooks I knew, because he was thrashing and foaming at the mouth. The vet popped her head in the door and asked if I was ready. "No," I said. So they gave me some more time with Brooks. The seizure passed and he was asleep, exhausted, barely alive.

 "Are you ready?"

 "No."

 Finally, I couldn't let Brooks face another seizure, and we had to say goodbye. I'll never, ever forget Brooks' gentle soul, his stoic acceptance of what must have been great pain in the days, weeks, who knows how long before he was diagnosed. The way he melted at my touch. He was so submissive, he would never look into my eyes. But every night he sat with me in my big green chair, chin on my lap.

Brooks, age 11, happy in my lap!

This wasn't supposed to be a memorial to the greatest dog that ever lived. This was supposed to be a post about why I want to adopt or foster senior dogs. I want to, because senior dogs are gentle and noble, often tired, yet full of wisdom that comes from experience. I can't stand to see them lonely and homeless in their golden years. They deserve a soft, comfy bed, and the peace of having a consistent, stable, loving home until they go to the rainbow bridge. I love senior dogs.

But then, I reconsider, could I do it? Would I be able to do love another dog as magnificent as Brooks, only to lose him in too short a time? Would I be able to do it once more, or twice, or again and again? Would the comfort of knowing I'm helping these sweet dogs outweigh the grief of losing them?

Does it hurt to lose a dog after having him for only one year any more--or less--than to lose a dog after having him for 8 or 10 or 13 years? It's quick and easy to get attached to a dog. Losing is painful, no matter when it happens.

Going Strong: a very old dog I met at Bark for Life Walk-a-thon.
















 So, if and when I adopt or foster senior dogs, I won't focus upon the losing. Instead, I'll keep my mind on the present. The happy times, where I witness this dog being loved and cared for, walking in the fresh air, sleeping on that comfy bed. Chasing a tennis ball, lounging on the couch, getting hair all over that couch, getting muddy paw prints on my kitchen floor. If I stay in the present, if I focus on what this dog needs right now, if I don't think about that part at the end when my tears flow and that comfy bed is empty...then, maybe then, I can foster senior dogs.


Want more positive pet tips, good news, and special offers? Fetch my free newsletter, Pawsitively Pets. Kelly and Ike hope to see you there!

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